Friday, October 17, 2008

Abelardo Morell

I just started a photography night class, so expect to see lots of photography inspiration over the next few months! A friend emailed me yesterday with a number of amazing photographers I'd never heard of before (Thanks S!) and I am now in love with the work of Abelardo Morell. One of the things he does, is he creates a camera obscura in a room then photographs the result, creating these wonderful magical inside/outside images. Enjoy!


Houses Across the Street in Our Bedroom, Quincy, MA, 1994


Manhattan View Looking South in Large Room, 1996


The London Eye inside the Royal Horseguards Hotel, London, England, 2000


Boston's Old Customs House in Hotel RoomI, 1999


Grand Canal Looking West Toward the Accademia Bridge in Palazzo Room Under Construction, 2007


The Philadelphia Museum of Art, East Entrance in Gallery #171 with a deChirico Painting, 2006

8 comments:

tina said...

fabulous! are you in dublin? if so, where are you doing your course? i'd love to do a course that covers history etc.

AH said...

If you like Morell's work, you might like the film I made about him.
I followed him around for over 7 years.
You can read more about it at my web site:
www.shadowofthehouse.com

Allie

lovelydisco said...

Wow! I love!

Lottie said...

What I need is a class in how to use all the functions on my camera rather than how to take a photo. life was simpler when I used a disposable.

Great shots.

The Clothes Horse said...

Oh yes, I love this photographer. Whenever people say photography isn't art, he's one of the people I tell them to go look up.

Inspire the Starling said...

Lush. I would love a living room with a beautiful land/city scape projected onto the walls. Hmmm x

mothersvea said...

Wow they are absolutely beautiful!

Rowley_J said...

These are such stunning images - recently having read into such things as they relate to Vermeer's painting practice & having had the opportunity to watch Hockney's 'Secret Knowledge' TV documentary again, I'm fascinated by the camera obscura, but these photos simply transcend any tchnical explanation.
As ever, thank you for sharing your discoveries, passions & aesthetic sensibility.